Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Phew!

Can't . . . move . . . arms . . . anymore. And this even after hiring "Two Men and a Truck" (that's the moving company's name) to cart the heavy furniture on Monday. All that remains are books to unpack and pictures to hang.

Saffron has adapted quite well to the new place, lounging around on the floor, testing the stability of the dresser by jumping on top of it from the bed, sitting in the living room window at twilight and making tiny cackling noises at fireflies.

Here's a sneak peak at the interior as it stands now. Vintage dining table on its way.

I discovered a fig tree in the front garden with at least nine green nubby figs on it, hopefully more by the end of the summer. Yum and yay! There is also a little stream and water-fall fountain fed by a pump that meanders under the stone path leading up to the front, constructed by previous landscape designer tenants. My landlord has promised to set up the pump for me. In the picture to the left you can see a dark crevace near the center of the photo. That's where the stream runs under the flagstones. It then curves around to the left, behind the japanese maple, and continues down to a little stone pond. The pump sends it back up through the garden to the top.

5 comments:

Hilaire said...

Goodness, that is such a gorgeous place. Congrats on being all moved in!

Eusebius said...

You must be exhausted - and still all your books to go (but arranging those must be quite fun)! The stream is very quaint - you can set up your sunbed, close your eyes, and imagine you are in the Umbrian hills...

muse said...

Thanks for the comments. I'm actually looking forward to unpacking the books, eusebius- it's been so long since I catalogued them, and I've finally moved 5 boxes of them to my office, so they won't be spilling out of my shelves onto the floor anymore! The stream is indeed quaint, but not in an overly precious way- it's kind of rough and tumble, very natural looking. But before I do anything with the garden (including weeding) I need to tackle all the poison ivy with weedkiller. I'm usually opposed to using such harmful chemicals but my landlady had to go to the ER last week with terrible PI after weeding in my backyard, so I'm thinking of it as chemotherapy for the garden.

eusebius said...

'chemotherapy for the garden' - a good trope! I didn't realise that you faced such dangerous flora in the South of the USA...

Are there any other nasties Carolina residents have to beware of in their neighbourhoods - bears, snakes, wasps??

The Evil Twin said...

new address?